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Patrick Galvin & Jungeun Kim in concert

Date & Time: Sat. March 25, 7:30 pm
Venue: 1750 29th Avenue, San Francisco
Tickets: $20 General, $15 Seniors/Students
Buy Tickets online

Program

Beethoven Violin Sonata No.5 in F Major (Spring Sonata)

  1. Allegro
  2. Adagio molto espressivo
  3. Scherzo: Allegro molto
  4. Rondo: Allegro ma non troppo

The Violin Sonata No. 5 in F major, Opus 24, is a violin sonata by Ludwig van Beethoven. It is often known as the “Spring Sonata” (Frühlingssonate), and was published in 1801. Its dedicatee was Count Moritz von Fries, a patron to whom Beethoven also dedicated two other works of the same year-the C major string quintet and the fourth violin sonata-as well as his later seventh symphony.

The work is in four movements. The Scherzo and its trio are particularly brief. The entire sonata takes approximately 22 minutes to perform. The name “Spring Sonata” was given to it after Beethoven’s death.  The Allegro movement is featured in the stage show Fame.

Debussy Violin Sonata in G minor, L.140

  1. Allegro vivo
  2. Intermède: Fantasque et léger
  3. Finale: Très anim

The Violin Sonata in G minor, L 140, for violin and piano was composed by Claude Debussy in 1917. It was the composer’s last major composition and the third work in what had originally been conceived as a cycle of six sonatas for various instruments (the first two being the cello sonata, L 135, and the sonata for flute, viola and harp, L 137). The work is notable for its brevity; a typical performance lasts about 13 minutes. The premiere took place on 5 May 1917, the violin part played by Gaston Poulet, with Debussy himself at the piano. It was his last public performance.

César Franck Sonata in A major for Violin and Piano

  1. Allegretto ben moderato
  2. Allegro
  3. Ben moderato: Recitativo-Fantasia
  4. Allegretto poco mosso

The work is cyclic in nature, all the movements sharing common thematic threads. Themes from one movement reappear in subsequent movements, but usually transformed. Franck had adapted this technique from Franz Liszt-his friend, and Cosima von Bülow’s father. Vincent d’Indy described the Sonata as “the first and purest model of the cyclical use of themes in sonata form”, and referred to it as “this true musical monument”. The movements alternate between slow and fast.

  1. Allegretto ben moderato, 9/8
    This gentle and sweetly reflective rocking theme, introduced by the violin after a short introduction by the piano, is the thematic core of the entire work. Franck originally intended it as a slow movement, but Ysaÿe preferred a slightly quicker tempo, and convinced Franck to mark it Allegretto.
  2. Allegro
    This turbulent movement is sometimes considered the real opening movement, with the Allegretto ben moderato serving as a long introduction.
  3. Ben moderato: Recitativo-Fantasia
    This is improvisatory in nature, and free in both structure and expression.
  4. Allegretto poco mosso
    The main melody is heard in canonic imitation between the instruments, and recurs in a rondo-like manner to a triumphant and soaring conclusion. James Harding described the movement as “a magnificent example of canonic writing, simple, majestic and irresistible in its ample, beautifully wrought proportions”.

Notes courtesy of Wikipedia.

About the artists

A San Francisco native, Patrick Galvin, began his violin studies with Roy Oakley at age 6 and made his solo debut with the Oakland East Bay Symphony at age 11 playing the Bruch Violin concerto. His teachers have included Barbara Gorzynska at the Prayner Konservatorium in Vienna, Austria; Camilla Wicks and Wei He at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music; and Herbert Greenberg at the Peabody Conservatory.

Patrick Galvin is a man of many musical trades. As a violinist, he performs classical recitals both solo and in chamber settings. He is also a member of the folk band Hoxton Mob which performs regularly throughout the San Francisco Bay Area. Recently, he has begun scoring radio stories for live performance. When he is not performing, Patrick teaches violin at a private school and out of his home in San Francisco. He also writes reviews for the online journal The Classical Voice.

patricgalvin

 

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